Expert article

Manual or electric – which chain hoist is right for your job?

Electric chain hoist

When workstations require a chain hoist lifting system, there are two primary categories of hoists that purchasers can choose from – manual chain hoists and electric chain hoists.

 

Steve Schneider, sales

 

When workstations require a chain hoist lifting system, there are two primary categories of hoists that purchasers can choose from – manual chain hoists and electric chain hoists.

Manual chain hoists typically serve maintenance applications and other infrequent or light duty service assignments where you cannot justify the extra expense of electric chain hoists. Manual chain hoists range from quarter-ton capacity to 20 tons. For tight spaces and light duty applications, manual lever pullers serve as a compact, lightweight alternative to manual chain hoists. 

Electric chain hoists serve light capacity applications that require more repetitive lifting. They typically are used with jib cranes, monorails and workstations. Electric chain hoists are available in a variety of speeds, from single speed for lower duty pick and place operations, to two-speed for greater control, on up to inverter controls that offer smooth operation along a wide range of variable speeds—from 16, 32 or 64 feet per minute.

Electric chain hoists with variable frequency drives provide smooth starts and stops of the trolley and hoist motions, which reduces wear and mechanical stress by minimizing load sway. The wider range of speed control also permits more accurate and precise load positioning.

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